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Zometool

Zometool

For some time, Zometool remained a bit of a secret from the general public. The product spoke for itself, however, among mathematicians and research scientists, who could immediately see uses for Zometool in their work. The system, with math based on Golden Section proportions and 2-, 3-, and 5-fold symmetries, applies to an amazing variety of scientific pursuits. NASA started using the tool for AIDS virus research in space, and for a space station project. After the discovery of quasicrystals, for which Dan Shechtman was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, both Shechtman and 2-time Nobel laureate Linus Pauling used Zometool during the debate over whether quasicrystals were real Zometool was and still is the only system capable of modeling quasicrystals. Mathematicians such as Roger Penrose of Oxford University and John Conway of Princeton University use Zometool to model complex geometric forms. After publishing his “An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything” in 2007, physicist Garret Lisi would sometimes use Zometool to illustrate the complex 8-dimensional structure (the E8) underpinning his theory which combines particle physics with Einstein's theory of gravitation.

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